Lesson 2.2 Lavender Flowers, Gel, & Insulating

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This lesson features an easy recipe that behaves nicely with heavy oils and heavy trace. The lesson features a simple spoon swirl design and demonstrates gel vs. non gelled soap. Forcing the gel phase vs. preventing gel is a basic concept in cold process soap making, and it is a decision that you will make with every batch you make. Here you will see how these two techniques look side by side and you will be able to compare them with the exact same recipe.


Difficulty: Beginner Video Time: 11:13 Minutes

Recipe Instructions

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Lavender Flowers Recipe

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Lavender Flowers : Lesson 2.2

   This recipe will yield about 3 lbs. of soap or 11 bars. The total weight of the soap described is the total amount weight after the water has evaporated and after the cure time. Each bar's weight is approx. 5.5 oz. This is a very nice base recipe with a combination of heavy and hard oils. This recipe is crafted to create a soap batter that will trace quickly and become thick as soon as it is emulsified. You may find you need to spoon the soap into the mold on transfer. This design is a very basic spoon swirl and can be done to any thick soap batter.

Ingredients:

  • 18.24 oz. Distilled Water

  • 6.77 oz. Of Lye (NaOH)

  • 16.8 oz Palm Shortening

  • 16.8 oz. Lard

  • 9.6 oz. Coconut Oil

  • 2.4 oz. Castor Oil

  • 2.4 oz. Shea Butter

  • 1.5 tsp. Titanium Dioxide

  • 1.5 tsp. Lavender Mica

  • 1.5 oz. Lavender Flowers Fragrance Oil  

Instructions

     Carefully pour lye crystals into cold distilled water. (Don't forget to wear your protection clothing: mask, glasses, and gloves) Completely dissolve the crystals, and set the water solution aside to cool to room temperature.

    Melt the hard oils and combine with the soft oils. Set this aside to cool to room temperature if necessary.

    Prepare the titanium dioxide by blending it down in 1 oz. water or 1 tbsp. of oil depending on the type of titanium dioxide you are using. (Read the package to see if yours is soluble in water or oil or either. I prefer water soluble TD.)

     When both the oils and the lye water solution are measured at a temperature within a 20 degree window, carefully pour the lye water solution into the oils and blend well with a stick blender. Once the soap is completely emulsified add the fragrance oil and blend until it is completely incorporated.

    Separate the soap into two parts and add the titanium dioxide into one part, and the lavender mica into the second part. Blend well.

     Transfer the soap into a three pound mold in alternating layers. The trace may become thick enough to spoon the batter into the mold, and this is perfectly fine for this design. Once the soap is completely transferred, give the soap a toss with a spoon to mix the colors a little more, but be sure to toss the soap in chunks and do not blend to much to keep the colors bold.

Notes

      Fragrance Oil: Know your fragrance oil. You may know that fragrance oils can discolor during the curing process, but many fragrance oils are naturally pink, golden, or blue right out of the bottle. If you pour a thick heavy golden fragrance oil, it will color your soap batter gold. Use a fragrance oil that is clear and also has a description from the manufacturer as not discoloring the finished project.

      Titanium Dioxide: Refrain from using too much titanium dioxide in your recipe. 1 tsp. per lb. is often written as the max usage. This recipe calls for 1.5 tsp. For 1.5 lbs. Of soap, so it does call for the max usage. Adding more titanium dioxide will not necessarily give you a whiter soap, but will make the soap brittle at the edges.

      Some recipes are more likely to get glycerin rivers than other recipes. This is one of those recipes. Glycerin rivers do not affect the quality of your soap, but you can control the look of glycerin rivers with a little practice. (See Lesson 2.3 for more on glycerin rivers)

      Lavender Flower Pieces – You may see home made soap designs that are decorated in little pieces of lavender flower buds, and you may want to decorate your soap. If you do, do not add these buds into the soap itself or they will turn brown as the soap is going through its chemical change. Lavender flower buds are best used as a décor sprinkled across the top.


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Lesson 2 Modules: Cold Process Soap Making

2.01: White Soap & Trace

2.01: White Soap & Trace

2.03: Glycerin Rivers & Soda Ash

2.03: Glycerin Rivers & Soda Ash

2.04: Super Fat, DOS, False Trace, & Ricing

2.04: Super Fat, DOS, False Trace, & Ricing

2.05: Neapolitan Clay Bar

2.05: Neapolitan Clay Bar

2.06: Salt Bar & Brine Soap

2.06: Salt Bar & Brine Soap

2.07: Drop Swirl Design

2.07: Drop Swirl Design

2.08: Hangar Swirl Design

2.08: Hangar Swirl Design

2.09: In the Bowl Swirl Design

2.09: In the Bowl Swirl Design

2.10: Column Pour / Spin Swirl Design

2.10: Column Pour / Spin Swirl Design

2.11: Peacock Swirl / Nonpareil

2.11: Peacock Swirl / Nonpareil

2.12: Lava Bubbles

2.12: Lava Bubbles

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